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Choose Dr. Morton as Your Hip or Knee Injection Doctor Today!

  • Experienced Orthopedic Surgeon
  • Nonoperative and operative treatments available
  • High success rate in providing joint injections
  • Excellent nonoperative treatments for arthritis available
  • Well-versed with modern techniques
  • Evidence-based injections, not driven by industry and marketing
  • Fellowship-trained in joint replacements

Joint injections are common orthopedic procedures. Your surgeon may provide you with a joint injection for various reasons including diagnosis, pain, and therapeutic treatment. There are various types of injections offered in different locations. Injections are often lower risk compared to surgical intervention. It is an excellent intervention for hip and knee arthritis.

Injections

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Types of Injections
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Types of Injections

Corticosteroid Injections

Steroid injections are typically composed of an anesthetic such as lidocaine and/or marcaine as well as the selected steroid. The lidocaine and marcaine take effect almost immediately and can provide relief for several hours. Typically if pain is relieved during this time, then we are addressing the appropriate pain generator. The steroid portion of the injection often takes 2-3 days to begin to take effect.

Adverse Reactions:

  • Infection – This is an extremely rare, but sometimes severe complications. If you have redness and severe pain following an injection – please seek emergency care.
  • Steroid flare – Sometimes patients experience an elevation in pain the day after a steroid injection. This often resolves over the course of 24 hours.
  • Elevation in blood glucose – Patients who undergo a steroid injection with a history of diabetes are encouraged to monitor their blood sugar levels and expect an increase over the next three days.
Gel Injections

Hyaluronic acid or gel injections are provided by many manufacturers. The original hyaluronic acid injections were derived from rooster comb. Gel injections theoretically act like a lubricant and shock absorber. The gel decreases swelling and friction, ultimately reducing pain There are now synthetic alternatives that exist to avoid allergic reactions to animal products. There is conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of these types of injections. It is approved for knee arthritis injections.

Adverse Reactions:

  • Infection – This is an extremely rare, but sometimes severe complications. If you have redness and severe pain following an injection – please seek emergency care.
  • Gel Reaction – The increase in the amount of fluid in the knee can cause severe pain.
Toradol

An alternative to steroid injections1. This medication works along a similar pathway to reduce pain. This is a less common injection modality. Research has investigated its use in knee osteoarthritis and subacromial bursitis. It is a good alternative to steroid injections as it will not provide an elevation in blood glucose and is a good option in patients with diabetes.

Adverse Reactions:

  • Infection – This is an extremely rare, but sometimes severe complications. If you have redness and severe pain following an injection – please seek emergency care.
  • Allergic reaction may occur.
  • Tests have not been performed in patients who have had poor tolerance to oral NSAIDs or have renal abnormalities.
  1. SM MCGowan, WE Rodriguez, T Visser, V Yellapu, PN Morton, GF Carolan, “A randomized Double-blind Study Comparing Intra-articular Corticosteroid to Intra-articular Ketorolac Knee Injections.” St Luke’s University and Health Network. AAOS, Mar 2019
Platelet-Rich Plasma

Platelet-Rich Plasma or PRP is a newer injection that has recently become more available.  Several studies have shown that it is only mildly helpful in the treatment of arthritis. However, PRP may be an alternative for patients who are experiencing certain types of tendinopathy. PRP is often expensive and insurance may not cover this procedure. Please seek medical advice before attempting to have this done.

Stem Cell Injections

There are many advertisements for stem cell injections for orthopedic problems. This is considered very experimental for osteoarthritis. Many studies on stem cell injections have been done, showing minimal improvement. No studies have demonstrated significantly successful treatment of orthopedic issues with stem cells. These are often expensive.

Injection Sites