Talk with Your Knee Expert Today!

Type your Full Name
Talk With Your Orthopedic Doctor Here!

Choose Dr. Morton as your Knee Expert Today!

Knee Pain is Common

About 25% of adults, or 63 million Americans, suffer from knee pain. It can interfere with everyday life and stop people from doing the things they want to do.  If you suffer from knee pain, there are many common causes.

Knee Pain

Content

Arthritis
Arthritis
Imflammmation
Pes Anserine Bursitis
Knee Replacement
Prepatellar Bursitis
Logo
Loose Bodies
Logo
Synovitis
Articular Cartilage Injuries
Knee dislocation
Osteochondral Flap
Meniscus Tear
Fracture
Fracture
Baker’s Cyst
Logo
Ligament Injuries and Sprains
Common Treatments for Knee Pain
When to See a Doctor
Summary
Frequently Asked Questions
Schedule Appointment

Arthritis

Knee arthritis presents with stiffness and pain. Often patients have several months to years of discomfort or pain. Many patients notice morning stiffness, discomfort when starting to move that improves with activity, and pain at the end of the day. With severe arthritis, knees can become very stiff or unstable, and make every-day functions very difficult.

Arthritis

Pes Anserine Bursitis

Pes Anserine Bursitis is inflammation of the bursa. The bursa is a small, fluid-filled sac between the tibia (shinbone) and tendons of the hamstring muscle. In bursitis, that sac becomes irritated, swells, and puts pressure on the knee. This pressure normally causes pain and tenderness on the inside of the knee.

Pes Anserine Bursitis

Prepatellar Bursitis

Prepatellar bursitis is inflammation of the bursa behind the kneecap, the patella. This often occurs in patients who kneel frequently, such as plumbers, gardeners, and roofers. Athletes who receive a blow to the knee are also at risk for the condition. Prepatellar bursitis is characterized by pain on the front of the knee. It may also be caused by a bacterial infection, although this is less common.

Prepatellar Bursitis

Loose Bodies

A loose body in the knee often occurs when a bony surface inside of the joint has broken off. For example, people with osteoarthritis have bone proliferation. The small spurs of bone can break off in the joint, irritating the surrounding area. Other people who have had knee trauma, such as patellar dislocation, may also have loose bodies. Symptoms include joint pain and locking of the joint.

Synovitis

The synovium is a layer of connective tissue inside the knee that lubricates the joint with synovial fluid. Synovitis is inflammation of that lining. It may be caused by overuse of the joint, such as in athletes, or pre-existing conditions, such as inflammatory arthritis. People with synovitis experience joint pain with no evidence of injury or swelling.

Articular Cartilage Injuries

The articular cartilage is the smooth layer covering the ends of bones. In the knee, it covers the ends of the femur and the tibia. This cartilage is very important to the painless, smooth motion of the joint. This cartilage is often damaged in conjunction with other injuries, such as injuries to the menisci or ligaments.

Osteochondral Flap

An osteochondral flap describes a distinct type of damage to the articular cartilage. When the cartilage is detached from the bone, that cartilage is generally considered irreparably damaged. However, some flaps of detached cartilage are considered viable if they have a healthy blood supply. This type of defect can be caused by an acute injury, similar to the injuries that accompany articular cartilage injuries, above. However, osteochondral flaps can also be associated with pre-existing joint disease.

Meniscus Tear

There are two menisci in the knee: the lateral meniscus and the medial meniscus. They are small, crescent-shaped pieces of cartilage that dissipate forces on the joint and help it glide smoothly. The menisci are easily torn. These tears can be acute, like in athletes, or chronic, such as in older people with tiny, degenerative tears that build on each other over time. Tears are associated with pain, stiffness, swelling, and knee instability or locking.

Meniscus Tear

Fracture

A knee fracture actually refers to a fracture of any of the three following bones: the femur, the tibia, and the patella. Typically, patients fracture their knees in high-velocity accidents, such as car accidents.